The Doors - 1970 "Morrison Hotel"

American rock group The Doors, from left to right: Ray Manzarek (organist), Robby Krieger (guitarist), Jim Morrison (lead singer), and John Densmore (drummer), posed for the MORRISON HOTEL album cover at Morrison Hotel in Los Angeles, California on December 17, 1969. Photo by Henry Diltz.
American rock group The Doors, from left to right: Ray Manzarek (organist), Robby Krieger (guitarist), Jim Morrison (lead singer), and John Densmore (drummer), posed for the MORRISON HOTEL album cover at Morrison Hotel in Los Angeles, California on December 17, 1969. Photo by Henry Diltz.

Morrison Hotel (sometimes referred to as Hard Rock Café from the title of the first side of the LP, with the second side titled Morrison Hotel) is the fifth studio album by American psychedelic rock band The Doors, recorded from between August 1966 and November 1969 and released by Elektra in February 1970.

The Doors returned to crunching, straightforward hard rock on Morrison Hotel, an album that, despite yielding no major hit singles, returned them to critical favor with hip listeners. An increasingly bluesy flavor began to color the songwriting and arrangements, especially on the party'n'booze anthem "Roadhouse Blues." Airy mysticism was still present on "Waiting for the Sun," "Queen of the Highway," and "Indian Summer"; "Ship of Fools" and "Land Ho!" struck effective balances between the hard rock arrangements and the narrative reach of the lyrics. "Peace Frog" was the most political and controversial track, documenting the domestic unrest of late-'60s America before unexpectedly segueing into the restful ballad "Blue Sunday." "The Spy," by contrast, was a slow blues that pointed to the direction that would fully blossom on L.A. Woman.

Although the Doors fourth album "The Soft Parade" (1969) had sold well and produced the smash hit "Touch Me," both fans and critics alike felt as though the band sold out. Compared to "The Doors" and "Strange Days" (both 1967) the band's more recent work had been viewed as overtly commercial. In the eyes of the Doors faithful, both "Waiting for the Sun" (1968) and "The Soft Parade" seemed to pale in comparison to the Doors first two albums. "The Soft Parade" in particular, with its strings and pop compositions, seemed to rub Doors fans and critics the wrong way. The negative feedback, however, ultimately worked to the Doors advantage. In response to the negative buzz, the Doors released what would ultimately be hailed as one of their finest albums "Morrison Hotel" (1970).

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Retrieved on 14 December 2018 from http://jazz-rock-fusion-guitar.blogspot.com/2015/12/the-doors-1970-morrison-hotel.html

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