THE TWISTED TALE OF HOW LATE ROCKER JIM MORRISON`S POETRY FOUND

Jim Morrison, lead singer of The Doors, posed for "The Young Lion" (aka "The American Poet") session at Joel Brodsky’s studio in New York City, New York on September 18, 1967. Photo by Joel Brodsky.
Jim Morrison, lead singer of The Doors, posed for "The Young Lion" (aka "The American Poet") session at Joel Brodsky’s studio in New York City, New York on September 18, 1967. Photo by Joel Brodsky.

There are things that are known and things that are unknown; in between are doors. —William Blake

Eighteen years ago Jim Morrison, private poet and tumultuously public lead singer for the Los Angeles rock band The Doors, was found dead in a Paris apartment.

Since then, the licentious Lizard King has become a cult hero, venerated by many who are too young to have ever seen him on stage. The songs he wrote and performed with The Doors remain a staple of FM radio; Elektra Records continues to sell more than 100,000 Doors albums, compact discs and cassettes every year.

Morrison`s modest grave in an obscure corner of the celebrated Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris is covered with flowers and graffiti left by devoted fans, despite the bizarre theories of rock conspiracists who claim that Morrison, inspired by the reclusive French poet Rimbaud, simply walked away from rock stardom for an anonymous life writing poetry in Africa.

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Retrieved on 30 December 2018 from https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1989-03-22-8903280648-story.html

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