Music Blu-ray Review: The Doors - Live at the Isle of Wight Festival 1970

Still captured from THE DOORS: LIVE AT THE ISLE OF WIGHT FESTIVAL 1970, the historic last concert ever filmed of The Doors on August 29, 1970.
Still captured from THE DOORS: LIVE AT THE ISLE OF WIGHT FESTIVAL 1970, the historic last concert ever filmed of The Doors on August 29, 1970.
THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY CHAZ LIPP AND PUBLISHED BY TMR ON MARCH 30, 2018.

Eagle Rock Entertainment has issued The Doors' Live at the Isle of Wight Festival 1970 as a two-disc (one Blu-ray, one CD) set. A portion of their set from that legendary festival is included in director Murray Lerner's outstanding documentary feature Message to Love: The Isle of Wight Festival (1997), but here we have the whole thing. Restored, remixed, remastered—looking and sounding quite beautiful. (Audio is offered in lossless DTS-HD MA 5.1 and LPCM 2.0 stereo.)

The seven-song, set was performed at the ungodly hour of 2 A.M. on August 29, 1970. Little more than a week earlier, court proceedings had begun against Jim Morrison for having allegedly exposed himself onstage in Miami the year before. Less than a year later, Morrison would die at the age of 27. In front of some 600,000-plus concert attendees, The Doors played what would become their last-ever filmed show. Running a little more than an hour, that show features Morrison in excellent voice but, with the weight of the impending trial hanging heavily, subdued in stage presence. 

It's a bit overstated by The Doors' late keyboardist Ray Manzarek, who goes so far to say that Morrison "moved nary a muscle." Indeed Morrison doesn't do much more than stand in front of the mic and sing. But it seems clear he is focused intently on his bandmates' playing, turning to watch intently during solos. The musical interplay between Manzarek, drummer John Densmore, and guitarist Robby Krieger is adventurous as usual. Give The Doors credit—while they lacked the technical acumen to rise to the level of the jazz greats they aspired to emulate, their improvisational approach led to consistently fascinating takes on their own material. 

Continue Reading

Comments (0)

Rated 0 out of 5 based on 0 voters
There are no comments posted here yet

Leave your comments

  1. Posting comment as a guest. Sign up or login to your account.
Rate this post:
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location