American rock group The Doors, from left to right: Jim Morrison (lead singer), Ray Manzarek (organist), and John Densmore (drummer), posed for publicity shots on the boardwalk in Venice, California in 1969. Photo by Henry Diltz.
POP EXPRESSO

The Doors Studio Albums With Jim Morrison Rated And Reviewed

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN AND PUBLISHED BY POP EXPRESSO ON DECEMBER 8, 2018.

The Doors career as a band with Jim Morrison was short, only six years, but those years were enormously creative and productive for them. The band always have been known as one of Rock’s most distinctive and different one due to their unique sound that blends musical styles so diversified such as Blues, Jazz, Latin, Psychedelic, Rock and Classical Music, they have gained new fans and followers over the years, and are still one of the most influential Rock bands today.

The Doors never intended to be different from their contemporaries but they were, and together created timeless music that hasn’t aged or fade with the years. We’ve rated, reviewed and tell you some of the back story behind all the six Doors studio albums made with Jim Morrison between 1967 and 1971.

“The Soft Parade”, 1969

Might seems like a cliché to list “The Soft Parade” as the weakest of all the six Doors studio albums with Jim Morrison, but it’s a necessary evil. The Doors 4th album, released on the aftermath of the Miami concert incident, was overall hated and smashed by the critic back in 1969 when it was first put out, and today, it’s still considered by the majority of the fans and Rock historians as their weakest. But how weak is “The Soft Parade”? Is it really a weak album or it just suffered from the enormous lack of promotion back in 1969 and the bad publicity about The Doors reputation that made it unable for the band to promote it? It might be a a bit of both.

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The Doors—from left to right: John Densmore (drummer), Robby Krieger (guitarist), Jim Morrison (singer), and Ray Manzarek (keyboardist)—arrive at Heathrow Airport in London, England on September 3, 1968. Photo by Granada Television.
ULTIMATE CLASSIC ROCK

HOW JIM MORRISON’S NEW YORK MOMENT INSPIRED ‘PEOPLE ARE STRANGE’

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY MARTIN KIELTY AND PUBLISHED BY ULTIMATE CLASSIC ROCK ON NOVEMBER 16, 2018.

Several stories circulate about the inspiration behind the Doors’ classic “People Are Strange” from their second album Strange Days. But keyboardist Ray Manzarek had a very clear version of his own.

Central Press/Getty Images / Jed Jacobsohn, Getty Images / Express/Getty
ULTIMATE CLASSIC ROCK

Keep Me In Your Heart: The Last Songs of 30 Legendary Artists

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY BRYAN WAWZENEK AND PUBLISHED BY ULTIMATE CLASSIC ROCK ON NOVEMBER 12, 2018.

Endings are difficult. Whether you’re expecting a slow fade to black or you get startled by an abrupt cut, finality can be hard to accept. It's no different in rock ’n’ roll. Each song in the list below is an ending, as we remember the last songs of 30 legendary artists.

“That’s it!” Janis Joplin laughed, and it was. “I ain’t too old to die,” Bon Scott sang, and he wasn’t. Rock history is littered with musicians who died young and many of the last recordings on this list preceded a death, from Jimi Hendrix’s “Belly Button Window” to Led Zeppelin’s “I’m Gonna Crawl.” Some artists’ final studio work was done in the service of a friend (Tom Petty, Lou Reed) while others were collaborations (Lemmy Kilmister, Chris Cornell).

Of course, some of these songs aren’t the result of a rock star’s death at all. When bands break up—from the Beatles to Cream to the Police—there has to be one, last recording. And then there are musicians, such as Billy Joel, who attempt to retire from the studio, even as they continue to perform.

Some of these last hurrahs rank with the artist’s best-known material (the Doors and Roxy Music went out with classics) and others are covers: The Band and Jerry Garcia said goodbye with tributes. Some acts delivered definitive final statements about their group (Pink Floyd) or even life itself (Warren Zevon), while others provided resonant insight into their last year of life on the planet (Freddie Mercury, Kurt Cobain).

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Jim Morrison, lead singer of The Doors, posed for "The Young Lion" (aka "The American Poet") session at Joel Brodsky’s studio in New York City, New York on September 18, 1967. Photo by Joel Brodsky.
HISTORY 101

November 11, 1969: The Doors frontman Jim Morrison is arrested by the FBI

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN AND PUBLISHED BY HISTORY 101 ON NOVEMBER 11, 2018.

In the history of rock and roll, there has been a pretty lengthy list when it comes to iconic groups. Who could possibly forget the Beatles, Queen, or even Pink Floyd? They are the champions, my friend. But there is one other memorable band that has consistently topped the charts since the ’60’s.

Ever heard of The Doors?

No, this is not a reference to Home Depot. The Doors was a rock band that got together in the city of L.A. in the year 1965. Decades later the radio is still playing those seriously catchy tunes.

Although the entire group stunned the world with hits such as “Light My Fire” and “Riders On The Storm,” one member definitely stole the show.

Jim Morrison was the man

The frontman of The Doors, Jim Morrison, is probably a name you’ve heard once or twice. He’s literally a rock and roll god, and he was as aesthetically-pleasing as he was talented.

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