Still image captured from HWY: AN AMERICAN PASTORAL, a film by Jim Morrison, Frank Lisciandro, Paul Ferrara, and Babe Hill. The film was shot during the spring and summer of 1969 in the Mojave Desert and in Los Angeles, California.
CONTACTMUSIC.COM

A Rainy Day Playlist - Ten Songs For Wet Weather

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY ED BIGGS AND PUBLISHED BY CONTACTMUSIC.COM ON NOVEMBER 10, 2018.

If there’s one thing that fundamentally defines the experience of living in Britain, it’s rain. Specifically, the curious ability to experience all four seasons in a day just by walking to the shops, but also the way in which rain—its absence, its imminence or its recent presence—constitutes such a significant topic of debate for the inhabitants of these dampened isles.

ROCK CELLAR MAGAZINE

A History of Rock and Roll Biopics (Inspired by the New ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Film)

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY ED RAMPELL AND PUBLISHED BY ROCK CELLAR MAGAZINE ON NOVEMBER 9, 2018.

Hollywood has had a long love affair with pop stars. Considering their often outrageous personas, lifestyles, talent and high profiles, pop music figures are naturals for movie biographies about them, and many have been shot. The release of Bohemian Rhapsody is likely to revive and rev up the film genre of rock and roll biopics. By this we mean biographical pictures about actual rock ’n’ roll musicians, in the way that Bohemian Rhapsody depicts Queen and its front man, Freddie Mercury.

They may cover all or a significant portion of singers and musicians’ lives — Bohemian Rhapsody, for example, focuses on 15 years in Mercury’s life. Rock and roll biopics usually focus on an individual or band and purport themselves to be at least in part fact-based.

So flicks about fictitious musical artistes like 1970’s Performance starring Mick Jagger as a reclusive rocker or 1983’s Eddie and the Cruisers (and its sequels) aren’t considered here. Neither is Prince’s 1984 Purple Rain, because it is only semi-autobiographical and his character is credited as “The Kid” – not as “Prince.” And although 1968’s Head stars the Monkees, this zany psychedelic pic (co-written by Jack Nicholson!) has no bio info about Davy Jones, etc., so it doesn’t qualify either. Nor do concert films like 1968’s Monterey Pop and 1970 Woodstock, which mainly record live performances but don’t tell musicians’ life stories.

In this stroll down movie memory lane, we remember many of the best and most offbeat rock and roll biopics. Most of the films considered in this eclectic look at rock biopics are feature films with actors, scripts, etc., with some outstanding exceptions. And as we’ll see, some of these films about rock’s greatest artists have been made by and star the cinema’s top talents. We begin our cinematic survey with some notable pre-rock precursors about blues musicians, folksingers, and end with one movie memorializing a classical composer.

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Rami Malek as Freddie Mercury, with Gwilym Lee as Brian May in background, in a scene from 'Bohemian Rhapsody,' the biopic about Mercury and his band, Queen. (20th Century Fox)
REPUBLICAN AMERICAN

Morning 5: Movie biopics about real bands/performers

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY BILL O’BRIEN AND PUBLISHED BY REPUBLICAN AMERICAN ON NOVEMBER 6, 2018.

“Bohemian Rhapsody” rocked the box office on its debut weekend, making $140 million worldwide. The biopic of Freddie Mercury and Queen had mixed reviews, but fans went anyway, helping Fox recoup its $52 million investment in a film plagued by production controversies (the director was fired).

Here are five previous film biopics about real bands or performers:

The Doors—Val Kilmer was a convincing Jim Morrison in this Oliver Stone biopic from 1991.

Sid and Nancy—From 1986, it tells the story of Sex Pistols founder Sid Vicious, played by future Oscar winner Gary Oldman.

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American rock group The Doors, from left to right: Robby Krieger (guitarist), John Densmore (drummer), Jim Morrison (singer), and Ray Manzarek (organist), posed in Frankfurt, Germany on September 14, 1968. Photo by Gunter Zint/K & K Ulf Kruger OHG/Redfern.
ULTIMATE-GUITAR.COM

Money Talks: 6 Musicians Who Did Not Swallow the Bait

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY V_POTEMKAH AND PUBLISHED BY ULTIMATE-GUITAR.COM ON NOVEMBER 5, 2018.

Life can be generous, even too generous sometimes. Are you strong enough to resist the bait? These musicians passed the test.

The Doors

In 1968, car company Buick realized that the Doors’ hit-single “Light My Fire” would sound great in their commercial. All it takes is changing the lyrics a bit from “Come on baby light my fire” to “Come on Buick light my fire”, and $75,000. Jim Morrison instantly refused an offer, though other band members were not that certain. Later drummer John Densmore explained:

"We had agreed that we would never use our music in any commercial, but the money Buick offered us had been hard to refuse. Jim accused us of making a deal with the devil and said he would smash a Buick with a sledgehammer onstage if we let them [change the lyrics]."

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American rock group The Doors, from left to right: John Densmore (drummer), Robby Krieger (guitarist), Ray Manzarek (organist), and Jim Morrison (singer), posed in-studio in Los Angeles, California in 1968. Photo by Guy Webster.
FAR OUT MAGAZINE

Take in the glory of The Doors performing ‘Crystal Ship’ and ‘Light My Fire’ in 1967

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY JACK WHATLEY AND PUBLISHED BY FAR OUT MAGAZINE ON NOVEMBER 2, 2018.

A tradition to many, American Bandstand was a TV show which offered the kids across America a chance to see the latest and newest bands on the scene. In July 1967 it was the turn of the revolutionary band The Doors, fronted by the lizard king Jim Morrison.

The Doors’ influence on culture, and music, in particular, is hard to argue with. The band’s development of musical artistry must’ve been an inspiration to so many artists in the 70’s who developed their own characters, films and content, as well as their own musical direction.

In 1967 though the band were about to embark on their now infamous European tour which would gather yet more followers to their sensual and sultry sound. The band pushed themselves apart from any faction, any establishment and any political rhetoric they did not agree with and because of it took a legion of fans along with them. The opportunity therefore to have a national audience proved another feather in the cap for a band unwilling to wear it.

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