American rock group The Doors, from left to right: John Densmore (drummer), Ray Manzarek (organist), Jim Morrison (singer), and Robby Krieger (guitarist), posed for publicity photos for the album WAITING FOR THE SUN in Laurel Canyon, Los Angeles, California in 1968. Photo by Paul Ferrara.
ANTI MUSIC

The Doors Stream Rough Mix Of Love Street (Week in Review)

“The Doors Stream Rough Mix of Love Street“ was a top story on Tuesday: (hennemusic) The Doors are streaming a rough mix of their 1967 track, "Love Street’” as a preview to the September 14 release of an expanded 50th anniversary edition of their third album, Waiting For The Sun.

The Doors’ photo shoot for the album WAITING FOR THE SUN was shot in Laurel Canyon, Los Angeles, CA. Photo by Paul Ferrara.
50TH ANNIVERSARY

The Doors - Waiting For The Sun: 50th Anniversary Edition

If, as social historians like to claim, the Summer of Love was 1967, then the following year was perhaps the other side of that coin of the realm for the peace, love, and togetherness movement. Assassinations, riots, and widespread unrest blanketed the year 1968, the same year The Doors’ third album Waiting for the Sun was released. Not blanketed in warmth and comfort, mind you, but rather draped over it, like the flag over the coffins of soldiers, or the last of the Baby Boomer generation’s heroes who met their end via assassination, or carpet-bombed in deadly poison across South Vietnam, or even smothered with water cannons used to wash away protesters on the streets of Chicago.

Val Kilmer as Jim Morrison in The Doors (1991)
THE TELEGRAPH

The Doors: the troubled making of Oliver Stone's bizarre Jim Morrison biopic

THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY ED POWER AND PUBLISHED BY THE TELEGRAPH ON SEPTEMBER 3, 2018.

All day they tramped around town: the movie star with slicked-back hair and the bespectacled musician who had once been famous. The star was Saturday Night Fever and Grease actor John Travolta—still, in the summer of 1980, a disco princeling hotter than a thousand raging suns. The musician, and Travolta's guide around Los Angeles that long, sweltering afternoon, was Ray Manzarek of The Doors.

People Are Strange: Contemplating The Doors’ Classic (& Strangeness)

Bit of a curiosity from The Doors here as we end the week on a musical number. People Are Strange was released as a single in September of 1967 (the band’s first single after the famous Light My Fire), so that’s 51 years back, and found pride of place on the Strange Days album. There was a quirky little video to accompany the quirky psychedelic rock number, too – so why not have a gander, you weirdo?

The Doors’ photo shoot for the album WAITING FOR THE SUN was shot in Laurel Canyon, Los Angeles, CA. Photo by Paul Ferrara.
antiMusic

The Doors Share Rough Mix Of 'Hello, I Love You'

The Doors are streaming a rough mix of their 1967 hit, "Hello, I Love You" as a preview to the September 14 release of an expanded 50th anniversary edition of their third album, Waiting For The Sun.